MAY AT VERGE GALLERY // 2016

OPENING MAY 5, 6-8pm, CONTINUING TO MAY 28
GALLERY 1 :: ANDREW HAINING, KATHERINE CORCORAN, ALEX CLAPHAM :: A/S/L/P
GALLERY 2 :: SARA MORAWETZ :: TIME IS A FLUID CONSTRUCT

PUBLIC PROGRAMS ::
DOUBLE VISION PRESENTS :: PHONE, GARY WARNER, PERFUME :: MAY 21, 1-4pm
MAY VERGE PUBLIC PROGRAMS ::  (including discussion for Sara Morawetz and tek seance for A/L/S/P) MAY 28, 11-5pm



ANDREW HAINING, KATHERINE CORCORAN, ALEX CLAPHAM :: A/S/L/P

The world is increasingly experienced through a connected, networked and socially mediated digital interface. The infinite possibility of the virtual exists in direct contrast to the material phenomena that underpins it’s presence.

Emerging representations of physical space and matter can disrupt conventional understandings of ‘the mental and social ecologies that produce us as subjects’. Through aesthetic and creative production we attempt to resist existing systems of power. In the making of new forms and alliances (sculptural, digital, personal, professional) we explore the endless spatial plane of the emerging digital as a stage for the production of new subjectivities.


SARA MORAWETZ :: TIME IS A FLUID CONSTRUCT

Time, popularly framed as a fixed, immutable substance, is commonly cast as something that cannot, will not change. It is viewed as an invariant – offering our lives a rigidity of form and contributing a sense of constancy to our daily routines. Yet in truth, time is far more mercurial and indeterminate. Our experience of time is not constant, rather, it flexes and yields to the specific nature of our passage through space.

Typically, we choose not to think of such motion, much less the uncertainty of it. Bound to Earth, these concepts seems imperceptible, for we know no time but our own. Yet as we chart our passage around the sun, revolving on our own familial axis, time operates differently elsewhere. Compelled by operations outside our experience, each planetary body moves in its own discrete cycles, heeding standards that are as foreign as they appear desultory.

Time is a Fluid Construct seeks to examine the philosophical limits of time as a standard measure through a manipulation of the underlying axioms upon which time itself is set. Documenting a pair of performative investigations, this exhibition considers how concepts of time both manifest and dissipate in the face of subversion. The two presented works, How the Stars Stand and 61/60, seek to dispute the assumed universality of time, through various representations of temporal experience as observed on Mars and in the presence of ‘leap’ seconds. In doing so Time is a Fluid Construct  asks us to contemplate what do we measure when we measure time?

This work was made in consultation with Dr. Michael Allison of NASA’s Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) and and Dr. Darren Engwirda of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT).


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